Blood Orange Marmalade

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I was astounded a couple of weeks ago to find some very inexpensive blood oranges.  Instead of devouring them as I did with the first couple of bags I bought, last week I decided to make some marmalade from them.  Making marmalade from any kind of citrus is easy:  Weight the fruit and cut it up, saving any trimmings and seeds to tie in a piece of cheesecloth.  Add double the weight in water and bring to a boil; simmer 1 hour.  Cool overnight.  Next day, weigh the fruit and water mixture and add an equal weight of sugar.  Cook to 222 degrees and pack in sterilized jars...  That's it!  Here's a more elaborated version with a few hints for making the process easier.

2 pounds blood oranges, preferably organic, rinsed well (I had just short of 2 pounds so I added a lemon)

2 quarts water

Sugar to equal the weight of the cooked fruit and water the next day (mine was 3.5 pounds)

Sterilized canning jars with 2-piece lids or sterilized lids and recycled jars

Trim the ends from the oranges; halve them or quarter them if large.  If they are seedy, cut away the central piece of pith and pop out the seeds.  Put any trimmings and seeds into a bowl lined with cheesecloth.

Use a very sharp stainless steel paring knife to cut the oranges paper thin as in the photo:

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Put the sliced fruit into a 7-quart enameled iron Dutch oven.  Add the water and tie up the cheesecloth w the seeds in it and add (photo above).

Bring to a boil and lower to a simmer:

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Cook for an hour, then cover and leave overnight.

Next morning, weigh the fruit and water and stir in an equal weight of sugar:

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Bring to a boil on high heat, then decrease heat slightly so that the mixture boils gently:

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Don't bother skimming until the marmalade is completely cooked.  Stir occasionally to make sure nothing is sticking to the bottom of the pan.

Cook to 222 degrees on an instant-read thermometer - it will take a little more then 30 minutes.  Slide the thermometer through a hole in a slotted spoon so that you can hold it over the boiling mixture without scalding the back of your hand:

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Slide the pan off the hot burner, let the marmalade top boiling, then use a shallow ladle to skim any foam from the surface:

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Set a shallow bowl near the pan of marmalade and place a sterilized jar in the bowl; set a jar funnel atop the jar and fill gradually to 1/4-inch of the top:

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Cover with a sterilized lid and hold the hot jar using a pot holder to tighten the lid.

Cool the jars.  As these have not been pressure canned in boiling water, the marmalade should be stored refrigerated.

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